The Geography of the Region About Devils Lake and the Dalles of the Wisconsin


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When it falls, the ground water surface is depressed, and the water in the wells becomes lower.

If the water surface sinks below the bottom of the wells, the wells "go dry;" if below the bottom of the valley, the valley becomes for the time being, a "dry run. On account of the free evaporation in the open valley, the valley depression must be somewhat below the level necessary for a well, in order that the flow may be constant. It will be seen that intermittent streams, that is, streams which flow in wet seasons and fail in dry, are intermediate between streams which flow after showers only, and those which flow without interruption.

In the figure the stream would become dry if the ground water level sank to A' A'. The case is not altered if the stream be fed by springs, for the valley finds the spring, as truly as the well-digger finds a "vein" of water.

The Good Land - Bouldering at Devil's Lake, Wisconsin

Limits of a valley. The permanent stream, like the temporary one which preceded it, tends to deepen and widen its valley, and, under certain conditions, to lengthen it as well. The means by which these enlargements are affected are the same as before. There are limits, however, in length, depth, and width, beyond which a valley may not go. No stream can cut below the level of the water into which it flows, and it can cut to that level only at its outlet. Up stream from that point, a gentle gradient will be established over which the water will flow without cutting.

In this condition the stream is at grade. Its channel has reached baselevel, that is, the level to which the stream can wear its bed. This grade is, however, not necessarily permanent, for what was baselevel for a small stream in an early stage of its development, is not necessarily baselevel for the larger stream which succeeds it at a later time. Weathering, wash, and lateral corrasion of the stream continue to widen the valley after it has reached baselevel.

The bluffs of valleys are thus forced to recede, and the valley is widened at the expense of the upland. Two valleys widening on opposite sides of a divide, narrow the divide between them, and may ultimately wear it out. When this is accomplished, the two valleys become one.

The limit to which a valley may widen on either side is therefore its neighboring valley, and since, after two valleys have become one by the elimination of the ridge between them, there are still valleys on either hand, the final result of the widening of all valleys must be to reduce [Pg 44] all the area which they drain to baselevel. As this process goes forward, the upper flat into which the valleys were cut is being restricted in area, while the lower flats developed by the streams in the valley bottoms are being enlarged.

Thus the lower flats grow at the expense of the higher. There are also limits in length which a valley may not exceed. The head of any valley may recede until some other valley is reached. The recession may not stop even there, for if, on opposite sides of a divide, erosion is unequal, as between 1a and 1b, Fig. In homogeneous material this will be when the slopes on the two sides are equal. The slopes 1A and 1B are unequal. The steeper slope is worn more rapidly and the divide is shifted from 1 to 4, where the two slopes become equal and the migration of the divide ceases.

It should be noted that the lengthening of a valley headward is not normally the work of the permanent stream, for the permanent stream begins some distance below the head of the valley. At the head, therefore, erosion goes on as at the beginning, even after a permanent stream is acquired. Under certain circumstances, the valley may be lengthened at its debouchure. If the detritus carried by it is deposited at its mouth, or if the sea bottom beyond that point rise, the land may be extended seaward, and over this extension the stream will find its way.

Thus at their lower, as well as at their upper ends, both the stream and its valley may be lengthened.

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A cycle of erosion. These inter-valley areas might at first be wide or narrow, but in process of time they would necessarily become narrow, for, once, a valley is started, all the water which enters it from either side helps to wear back its slopes, and the wearing back of the slopes means the widening of the valleys on the one hand and the narrowing of the inter-valley ridges on the other.

Not only would the water running over the slopes of a valley wear back its walls, but many other processes conspire to the same end. The wetting and drying, the freezing and the thawing, the roots of plants and the borings of animals, all tend to loosen the material on the slopes or walls of the valleys, and gravity helps the loosened material to descend.

Once in the valley bottom, the running water is likely to carry it off, landing it finally in the sea.

Thus the growth of the valley is not the result of running water alone, though this is the most important single factor in the process. Even if valleys developed no tributaries, they would, in the course of time, widen to such an extent as to nearly obliterate the intervening ridges. The surface, however, would not easily be reduced to perfect flatness.

For a long time at least there would remain something of slope from the central axis of the former inter-stream ridge, toward the streams on either hand; but if the process of erosion went on for a sufficiently long period of time, the inter-stream ridge would be brought very low, and the result would be an essentially flat surface between the streams, much below the level of the old one. Into tributary valleys water would flow from their sides and from their heads, and as a result they would widen and deepen and lengthen just as their mains had done before them.

By lengthening headward they would work back from their mains some part, or even all of the way across the divides separating the main valleys.

Wallace W. Atwood and Rollin D. Salisbury

By this process, the tributaries cut the divides between the main streams into shorter cross-ridges. With the development of tributary valleys there would be many lines of drainage instead of two, working at the area between two main [Pg 46] streams. The result would be that the surface would be brought low much more rapidly, for it is clear that many valleys within the area between the main streams, widening at the same time, would diminish the aggregate area of the upland much more rapidly than two alone could do.

The same thing is made clear in another way.

Wallace W. Atwood and Rollin D. Salisbury

In this way the amount of sloping surface is greatly increased, and as a result, every shower would have much more effect in washing loose materials down to lower levels, whence the streams could carry them to the sea. The successive stages in the process of lowering a surface are suggested by Fig.

The uppermost section represents a level surface crossed by young valleys. The next lower represents the same surface at a later stage, when the.

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Vol. 4 No. 5 (22 June )

Diagram illustrating how a hard inclined layer of rock becomes a ridge in the process of degradation. In this manner a series of rivers, operating for a sufficiently long period of time, might reduce even a high land mass to a low level, scarcely above the sea. The new level would be developed soonest near the sea, and the areas farthest from it would be the last—other things being equal—to be brought low. The time necessary for the development of such a surface is known as a cycle of erosion , and the resulting surface is a base-level plain , that is, a plain as near sea level as river erosion can bring it.

The Geography of the Region About Devils Lake and the Dalles of the Wisconsin The Geography of the Region About Devils Lake and the Dalles of the Wisconsin
The Geography of the Region About Devils Lake and the Dalles of the Wisconsin The Geography of the Region About Devils Lake and the Dalles of the Wisconsin
The Geography of the Region About Devils Lake and the Dalles of the Wisconsin The Geography of the Region About Devils Lake and the Dalles of the Wisconsin
The Geography of the Region About Devils Lake and the Dalles of the Wisconsin The Geography of the Region About Devils Lake and the Dalles of the Wisconsin
The Geography of the Region About Devils Lake and the Dalles of the Wisconsin The Geography of the Region About Devils Lake and the Dalles of the Wisconsin

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